9 Comments
Feb 13Liked by Classical Wisdom

Love is willing the good of the other because they are made in the image and likeness of God as are we all, according to Thomas Aquinas.

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Feb 12Liked by Classical Wisdom

I have always found love to be synonymous with gravity, amorphous, just plain hard to describe, but when smitten, I would say you have a better chance of jumping off of earth.

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Feb 12Liked by Classical Wisdom

A couple of thoughts about “love”:

Firstly, I have never thought it wise to refer to Lust as Love. Love has been given the barn door. It’s definition is too wide IMO.

Secondly, I believe the statement “You must love yourself before you can love others” is a half truth at best. It must be qualified. You could just as easily say “You must have the capacity to love others before you can truly love yourself”. Pure, unalloyed self-love is a symptom of evil. It is narcissism.

Why are there so many definitions of love that do not, on close examination, share the same characteristics, however we insist on using the same word?

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Feb 12Liked by Classical Wisdom

Perhaps at its simplest it is the absence of fear and an affirmation of the mystery of life…..

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Lincoln from his ascendance to the presidency worked to end the war, and to rebuild a better country until his death. Lincoln even pardoned many young Confederate soldiers. At the same time, Union prisoners that were not exchanged, risked their being held at Andersonville.

Lincoln met with Grant and Sherman specifically to seek a way to avoid more battles. Even some Confederate legislators tried to make a treaty without success.

True, ending the war earlier would have had other benefits than winning a few more Union battles but that was not to be.

Depicting Lincoln as a criminal, or a warmonger is improper. Lincoln is in most historians credited as being the best president

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One of the greatest sources of what is Love, that I have read, comes from Plato's Dialogue of the Symposium. There are the common answers people give, and those of Aristophanes. But most importantly the answer Socrates gave, shedding a whole new light on the subject.

I recently wrote about it. I don't fancy myself an author, but love to share ideas that are profound such as this:

https://open.substack.com/pub/warrenbaxter/p/the-myth-of-love?utm_source=share&utm_medium=android&r=pg6fv

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