4 Comments

What an Awesome Word! Thank You Both! ( Joel....excellent hand grenade to lob in while heading off !)

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Sep 11, 2023·edited Sep 11, 2023Liked by Classical Wisdom

Naval gazing might be called contemplation. Contemplation, meditation. Meditation, prayer.

Naval-gazing and prayer describe nearly identical activities, but the former connotes indulgence or self-absorption, the later respectful humility. And for sure, there may be large differences in attitudes while undertaking this activity (or perhaps lack of activity is a more appropriate definition) but its striking how differently the two words come off.

Balance, is essential between thinking and acting. I agree with Arendt's sentiments, and think in general we are out of balance in the modern Western world, favoring action, sometimes really mindlessly. Acting on impulse and convenience, lots of short-term, egoistic thinking, is not so healthy and lands one with trouble in the long run, without adequate respect for long term consequences and complex interactions, in my experience. But so does thinking so much you are paralyzed by it and fail to take action and miss the world in front of you, opportunities that exist only now. Hence the necessity of balance and synthesis of thinking/planning with acting/reacting.

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I actually think we should navel gaze more. I'm sure there is light to be had from it.

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The navel is one of a few different gazing points, known as Drishti, in ancient, traditional yoga practices. Every yoga posture has a prescribed Drishti, which is intended to develop focus and concentration as well as to keep one’s practice internal. Yoga with Drishti is also a form of prayer.

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